The Jesse Tree for the Third Week of Advent

The Jesse Tree: 3rd Week of Advent

by James P. Campbell, D.Min.
Liturgical Year: Advent

The ornaments of the Jesse Tree tell the story of God in the Old Testament, connecting the Advent season with the faithfulness of God across four thousand years of history.

We’ve included people and ornaments for each day during a long Advent season of 28 days. When the season is shorter, you may wish to use some of the stories from the fourth week during this week.


Sunday: Elijah
Ornament: Stone Altar

Elijah Fights the False Gods

God now calls Elijah to confront Ahab and pagan gods. He is going into enemy territory: Jezebel is killing off the prophets of Israel. In spite of the danger, Elijah is not put off. When he meets with the king, Ahab calls Elijah the “troubler of Israel.” Elijah responds by challenging the priests of Baal and Asherah to a contest with the God of Israel.

Elijah is Fed by God — 1 Kings 17
Elijah Confronts Baal — 1 Kings 18

 


Monday: Hezekiah
Ornament: An Empty Tent

Hezekiah

Ahaz was not faithful to God, engaging in such contemptible practices as sacrificing one of his sons in the Canaanite way (2 Kings 16:1-4). When Ahaz died, he was replaced by his surviving son, Hezekiah. Hezekiah tried to make up for his father's unfaithfulness.

 

 

 

 


Tuesday: Isaiah
Ornament: Fire Tongs with Hot Coal

Isaiah and the Call to Holiness

In response, one of the seraphs flies to Isaiah with a live coal taken from the altar and touches his lips with it, declaring that his guilt has departed. Isaiah then hears the voice of the Lord saying, “Whom shall I send, and who will go for us?” And Isaiah replies, “Here am I; send me!” (Isaiah 6:8).

The Still Small Voice — 1 Kings 19
Isaiah's Vision — Isaiah 6
Isaiah's Message — Isaiah 1-2
A Savior Will Come — Isaiah 9; 11

 


Wednesday: Jeremiah
Ornament: Tears

Jeremiah

Jeremiah teaches that the people cannot pray faithfully if they continue to oppress the immigrants, the orphans, and the widows. They have to stop shedding innocent blood (some practiced human sacrifice), and they must act justly toward one another. “Here you are, trusting in deceptive words to no avail. Will you steal, murder, commit adultery, swear falsely, make offerings to Baal, and go after other gods that you have not known, and then come and stand before me in this house, which is called by my name, and say, ‘We are safe!'—only to go on doing all these abominations? Has this house, which is called by my name, become a den of robbers in your sight? You know, I too am watching, says the Lord” (Jeremiah 7:8-11).

Jeremiah's Temple sermon — Jeremiah 7; 26
Jeremiah Speaks against Jerusalem — Jeremiah 28
Sorrow for the Fall of Judah — Lamentations 1
Jeremiah's Message of Hope — Jeremiah 29; 31


Thursday: Habakkuk
Ornament: Stone Watchtower

Habakkuk: Patient Waiting

Acknowledging that he does not understand God's will, Habakkuk stands ready to hear what God has planned. God assures Habakkuk that no matter what seems to be happening on the surface, God's ultimate plan for the Judeans who live in faithfulness will not be delayed. “For there is still a vision for the appointed time; it speaks of the end, and does not lie. If it seems to tarry, wait for it; it will surely come, it will not delay” (Habakkuk 2:3).

The Sack of Jerusalem and the Fall of Judah — 2 Kings 24-25


Friday: Nehemiah
Ornament: City Wall

Nehemiah Reform and Renewal

After persuading the king to let him return to Judah, Nehemiah was named governor and given permission to rebuild the walls of Jerusalem. When he arrived in Jerusalem, Nehemiah rallied the people and rebuilt or restored the walls in fifty-two days. However, he realized that the people were spiritually lax and must also be rebuilt. Ezra read the Law to the people and helped them understand its demands.

Ezra and Nehemiah — Nehemiah 8-9

 

 


Saturday: John the Baptist
Ornament: Scallop Shell


John the Baptist

Jesus had immense respect for John the Baptist saying, “among those born of women no one has arisen greater than John the Baptist” (Matthew 11:11). John was called by God to be a prophet and prepared himself to follow this call. Dedication to a goal means some reevaluation of priorities. John apparently wanted to be free of any obligations except getting ready to proclaim the coming of the Messiah. He wanted people to know that the time for the Messiah to come was near. This meant that their priorities in life needed to be reconsidered. When we realize that we are being called to a new life in Christ, we have to consider what sacrifices we are going to be called to make to change our lives. While we will not be called to the extremes that John the Baptist was, we also need to recognize that life has to be different if we are going to be faithful.


This information is excerpted from The Stories of the Old Testament: A Catholic's Guide by Jim Campbell.



James P. Campbell, D.Min. 

Jim Campbell, father of two children and grandfather of six, is a religious educator and author.

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